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20121201
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in michigan, one of the fellows i met there was bob dole, and we became good friends, even to this day. and when i asked him, what are your plans, and he, without hesitating said, i'm going to be a county clerk. after that, i'm going to run for the state house. of course, first opening in congress, that's where i'm going. i figure that's a good idea. so i went to law school. i became assistant prosecutor. when the territorial office became available, i ran for that office. and when stated came along, i got to congress. a little ahead of bob. >> you were in the territorial legislature then before you became -- >> two terms in the house and part of a term in senate spent and then came here as a member of the house. and who did you come here with at that time? >> the house had one member. >> you mentioned senator dole, and the fact that you had been in the hospital with him in michigan. it's amazing that some of these friendships were formed long before any public service, norma minetta talks about being a friend of, excuse me, the sender from wyoming, al simpson, and meeting him when he
, he said. i met jim webb in my office not far from here. as a result of senator bob kerry asking me if i would spend some time with him, i was happy to do so, i'll never forget that meeting, just the three of us in the room. for those of us who have worked with bob kerrey, he was such -- he is and was such a vibrant person. it's almost mischievous, i guess is the way to put it. you could just tell how he had just a little touch of differentness. and when he brought him in to visit with me, i learned very quickly they were both warriors. bob kerrey, a navy seal, recipient of the medal of honor, and jim webb, as we've said, navy cross, two silver stars, two bronze stars. both veterans of the vietnam war. as we sat talking, it was obvious that they were both fighters, warriors, and jim certainly proved that in his 2006 campaign. the reason bob wanted me to visit with him is because jim webb had decided he wanted to run for senate. what did i think of it? well, i probably told jim what a lot of people told him -- you want to run for the senate? the election's right upon us. no, he said,
heroic things during that war. and it also has the support of former senate majority leader bob dole, certainly a patriot. senator dole, a disabled veteran from world war ii, who led the fight to pass the treaty, was here yesterday urging republicans to support it. now, mr. president, think about that. robert dole, who was grievously injured in world war ii, spent more than two years in a hospital, he came to this senate floor, and the first speech he gave was on disabilities, and we needed to do something about it. he was here -- he led the fight to pass the treaty, urging republicans to support it. a few republicans greeted him as he was in his wheelchair here. they greeted this 89-year-old war hero, i repeat, patriot, who just last week was in walter reed hospital. then one by one, all but a handful of them voted against the treaty, ensuring its failure. but their professed reasons for opposing it had no basis in fact -- none. most republicans acknowledge that. some use an excuse, well, it is a lame duck. we shouldn't be doing it in a lame duck. i mean, wow ... and there's no just
spent on friday about an hour with bob kerrey. bob kerrey and i reflected back on his experience here in the senate and one memorable meeting that he and i had. and the purpose of that meeting was for bob kerrey to introduce me to the presiding officer. and it was a wonderful meeting because when the meeting finished -- i won't go into detail on everything i said but the presiding officer knows -- i came out of that meeting recognizing how what kindred spirits these two gallant warriors are and were. both having been highly decorated, one in the navy, the other a marine. one medal of honor, the other -- the presiding officer -- navy cross, silver star, more than one bronze star for valor, a number of purple hearts. as i said again, but i can't say it too much, what an honor and pleasure it has been to serve in this body with the senator from virginia, jim webb. i've learned so much about what difference a positive attitude will make. no better example of that is the new g.i. bill of rights. to think that a new senator, a brand-new senator would have the idea, the confidence that i can
and found a few off the record and one on the record, bob bennet, lieutenant to mitch mcconnell saying, yes, mitch told us all we're going it try to block everything we can, and if we cannot, throw sand in the works, as much as we can, and, of course, the process of filibustering, which requires the two days for the cloture motion to ripen, a lot of time on the floor as you go through the process, and then if you achieve cloture, allowing the 30 hours of the post cloture debate, and you can demand the full 30 hours, and you don't even have to debate becomes a very tempting tool to use to soak up an enormous amount of floor time because if you have an ambitious agenda as the majority, floor time becomes a very precious commodity, and it's that process, then, you know, you can point to examples of bills and nominations that ultimately pass unanimously that were taken through. in the case of bill's, in many instances, a motion, filibuster on the motion to proceed, which ended up with a cloture motion that passed overwhelmingly, but then another filibuster on the bill itself, and then we see fi
and talk to senators and found a few off the record and one on the record. bob bennett that was in the senate of mitch mcconnell and he said yes, mitch mcconnell said that we are going to try to block everything. we can't block it, we will throw as much sand in the works as we can. of course, the process of filibustering, which requires the two days for the cloture motion to rise, a lot of time on the floor, as we go through this process, and then if you achieve this cloture, allowing 30 hours of post-cloture debate, you can command a full 30 hours that you don't even have to debate. it becomes a very tempting tool to use -- four times become a precious commodity. it points to what passes unanimously that was taken through. in the case of bills, emotion, a filibuster on the motion to proceed. which ended up with a cloture motion that passed overwhelmingly. all designed to use up more floor time. that is the restoration of the majority. now we can get to the appropriation of the minority. in the fact is that we do have something that is a chicken and egg problem. we saw
him to in michigan, senator inouye made his two lifelong friends, one senator bob dole, who as we know, became majority leader here in the senate and the republican nominee for president of the united states. and his other lifetime friend is the late senator phil hart, who was known as the conscience of the senate and the hart building, the massive senate office building, is named after him. asked by his son why after being classified as an enemy alien he and the members of the 442nd fought so heroically, senator inouye said in his usual, calm man, for the children. and for the children there could be no finer role model than senator dan inouye. he was a recipient of the medal of honor, a congressional gold medal, the highest honor can bestow. he served the distinguished service cross, a bronze star for valor and, of course, a purple heart. dan inouye showed the same dedication in congress he displayed on if battlefield. i want to take just a little bit here, mr. president, and talk about a meeting that i had, i mentioned it very previously last night but it was ten days ago. i knew se
sons, mark, bob, john and david, and the entire lugar family, most of which is with us here in the galleries today. their strength and sacrifices have been indispensable to my public service. i'm also very much indebted to a great number of talented and loyal friends who have served with me in the senate, including, by my count, more than 300 senators, hundreds of personal and committee staff members, and more than a thousand student interns. in my experience, it is difficult to conceive of a better platform from which to devote one's self to public service and the search for solutions to national and international problems. at its best, the senate is one of the founders' most important creations. a great deal has been written recently about political discord in the united states, with some commentators judging that partisanship is at an all-time high. having seen quite a few periods in the congress when political struggles were portrayed in this way, i hesitate to describe our current state as the most partisan ever, but i do believe that as an institution, we have not live
they took him to in michigan, senator inknew -- senator ininouye, two phones, bob dole, and the republican nominee for president of the united states, and this other lifetime friend is senator phil hart, who was known as the conscience of the senate,, a massive senate office building named after him. senator said in his usual calm manner, for the children. and for the children there could be no finer role model than senator dan inouye. congressional gold medal. highest honor congress can bestow, the distinguished service cross, bronze star for valor, and of course, a purple hurt. dan inouye showed the same dedication in congress as he displayed on the battle field. i want to take just a little bit here, mr. president, and talk about a meeting i had -- i mentioned it briefly last night, but it was ten days. i knew that senator inouye was not feeling well, so i went down to his office, and he has a remarkable office. it's a beautiful office. but there isn't one single frame on the wall depicting what great man he is. there are no awards, there are no commemorative statues, all he has in his
-night. >> not really. >> is bob still here? what would you like to ask senator rubio? [laughter] >> are you still doing this shit? [laughter] spent ask him a real question. i decline. [laughter] >> okay. last night talked about a new direction. one of the things that you talk about is -- [inaudible] and how to mike higher education in how to reform programs be the number one thing you would do, you can do as a freshman minority speakers i don't think there's a number one thing. there's a number of things. we got to get them all. the biggest obstacle we face in the 21st century doesn't look like the 21st century. not just in a jewel to graduate high school. still continues to be a significant part of folks that are going into college but it's also the 38 year old who decided to go back to school and get a degree. that was my sister. it's also the 25 year old that's after 10 years of being out of high school has been stuck in a service area jobs and deciding they want to empower themselves to that greatness is that technological advance our not only going to lower the time and costs of getting that kind
by a republican -- by a republican majority leader. senator bob dole was the first one to use the first so-called filling the tree. used it seven times. senator byrd, who never used it, that gag rule to stop the minority from offering amendments, i guess, was disappointed he hadn't thought of it so he found a way to use it three times as he was the majority leader. senator mitchell used it three times, senator lott 11, senator daschle only once this gag rule, senator frist 15. all of those leaders used it 40 times. our majority leader, senator reid has used it 68. so we can all come up with statistics on both sides, but shouldn't we just resolve that what we would like to do, show the country that we're grown-up, responsible adults and we can sit down and say, yes, we can agree on ways to make sure that most bills come to the floor and senators get to offer most of the amendments that they want to offer on the bill? i think we can do that. i think there's a spirit on both sides of the aisle to do that, and i'm working toward that goal, and i know a number of democrats and republicans are d
.r.s., these are the numbers. since 1985, senator bob dole filled the tree -- used the gag rule -- seven times. senator byrd used it three times. senator mitchell used it three times. senator lott, when he was majority leader, used the gag rule 11 times. that is, cut off amendments. senator daschle only one time. senator frist, 15 times sm. those are the majority leaders. since 1985, awful those majority leaders -- all of those majority leaders used it a combined 40 times. our current majority leader, senator reid, has used it, as of yesterday, 69 times since he became leader in 2007. this trend, this gagging of the minority, is the primary cause of the senate's dysfunction. so, madam president, i wanted to correct the record. made a mistake and i'm glad to come. i don't want senator dole get the credit for that when senator byrd actually figured it out of and i want to leave a more -- i want to leave an optimistic -- i want to conclude with an optimistic point. i think most of us -- and i would include the distinguished senator from new hampshire in the chair because we've been together in discussions, bip
of the n.s.a., general alexand alexander, with bob mueller at the f.b.i. we've had eric holder appear before the committee to discuss this. and we have heard from intelligence community professionals involved in carrying out surveillance operations, the lawyers who review these operations and, importantly, the inspectors general who carry out oversight of the program and have written reports and letters to the congress with the results of that report. i'd like to just show that classified letter, if i might. it's classified -- i can't read it to you -- but i just want to make that available -- members know that if they want to read the i.g. letter on why what senator wyden is asking for cannot be done, please, before you vote, go to our skiff and read the letter. i don't happen to have it here but as soon as somebody brings it, i will waive it for a -- i will wave it for a moment so that you see it. the committee's review of f.a.a. surveillance authorities have included the receipt and examination of dozens of reports concerning the implementation of these authorities over the past fo
of the senate foreign relations committee for her work, senator bob menendez on the foreign relations committee. all those were very instrumental in dealing with this. senator durbin who has been a real champion on human rights. i want to acknowledge kyle parker, a staff person from the helsinki commission who was very instrumental in the development of this legislation, and i want to also acknowledge senator lieberman's work. i know he will be speaking in a few minutes. it was senator lieberman and senator mccain and myself that first suggested that we should pass the magnitsky bill, it's the right thing to do, but we certainly shouldn't let pntr go without attaching the magnitsky bill. i want to thank senator lieberman and thank senator mccain for raising that connection. it was the right thing to do. first of all, it allowed us to get this human rights tool enacted. secondly, i think it gave us the best chance to get the pntr bill done in the right form. so i want to thank both of them for their leadership on that. in 1974, we passed the jackson vanik law. it dealt with the failure of the so
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14